Issue #16 – Something to Believe In

saltSuperstitions are the belief that one event leads to the cause of another event without any common element linking the two. They are driven by the fear of the unknown, faith in magic, and a belief in luck…good and bad. Because some superstitions have been passed down from generation to generation you might not even know their origins.

Here are some of the more well-known superstitions and the beliefs behind them.

There are many superstitions about salt and why spilling it is considered a bad omen, but there is usually one remedy; take a pinch and throw it over your left shoulder to keep evil spirits away. Make sure it is your left shoulder because it is believed that your guardian angel is behind your right shoulder

black cat In England, during the late 1500’s, an injured black cat was seen entering the house of a woman that was alleged to be a witch. The next day the woman was bandaged and bruised. This led to the belief that witches were transforming themselves into black cats in order to prowl the streets unobserved. This carried over to the Americas and was one of the central beliefs during the Salem witch hunts.

 

 

It is believed that walking under a ladder is bad luck. That is because the ladder forms a triangle which resembles ladder

the Holy Trinity and walking under it was a desecration to God. You may protect yourself by crossing your fingers while passing underneath.

 

 

 

horseshoeThe belief that horseshoes are said to bring good luck is the result of a combination of myths; a horseshoe has 7 nails, and 7 is said to be a lucky number, the horseshoe resembles a crescent moon which is said to bring good fortune, and horseshoes are made of iron which was believed to ward off evil.

 

 

 

 

Finding a cricket in your house will bring good luck. Crickets are considered a symbol of good luck, especially in Asian and Native American cultures because at the sign of danger it is believed that they stop chirping.cricket

 

What is your superstition? 

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Who knows? Your superstition just might be in our next issue!

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